A platform across African Great Lakes for community testimonies on environmental challenges and solutions fostering accountable and participative natural resource management

Lake Edward Fisheries

 

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Lake Edward, shared by the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Uganda, is situated at an altitude of 912 meter above sea level. Together with lakes Kivu, Albert, George and Tanganyika it forms the western loop of the East African rift valley system (Snoeks et al., 1997). Surface area is aprox. 2240 km2 (1630 km2 in Congolese territory, 610 km2 in Uganda). The maximum depth recorded is 117 m, whereas mean depth is estimated at 33 m. The deepest zones (>40 m) all occur in Congo. The mean depth in Congo is estimated at 40 m, whereas mean depth in Uganda is estimated at 17 m.


In the south of the lake two affluent rivers (Rwindi and Rutshuru rivers) drain the lake, whereas in the southeast two small rivers (Lula and Talia rivers). In the north, the Semliki river connects Edwards lake with Albert lake, and in the northeast the lake is connected with George lake by the Chenal de Kazinga river.

In the last three decades, the great African lakes have been subjected to rising fishing pressures, and lake Edwards is no exception. This high fishing pressure may put into danger local food security, reason why much attention is being paid recently to the implementation of fisheries management frameworks.

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In comparison with other great lakes, lake Edward is exceptional for being inserted within two national parks: Virunga national park (Democratic Republic of Congo) and Queen Elisabeth National Park (Uganda). This particular situation is supposed to benefit protection of aquatic biodiversity and participative cross-border management of lake resources.

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For more information on Lake Edward’s Lessons for Fisheries Management consult the following articles:

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Introduction of Lake’s Edward Case

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1. FISH FAUNA OF LAKE EDWARDS

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2. CHARACTERIZATION OF FISHERIES

a) Situation before 1988
b) Situation in 1988 (Vakily, 1989)
c) Situation in 2006 (Petit, 2006)
d) Situation in 2014
e) Fisheries potential Lake Edward in Democratic Republic of Congo

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Lessons for Fisheries Management

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3. FISHERIES MANAGEMENT

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a) Fisheries legislation
b) Local fisheries regulations
c) Control and monitoring systems

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4. VALUE CHAINS

a) Institutional mapping
b) Organization of fishers and fisher women
c) Value chain analysis

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5. DISCUSSION

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6. RECOMMENDATIONS

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7. REFERENCES

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